Maurizio shouldn’t be ‘Sarri’ for Arsenal outburst

Racepoint Global

Written by: Danny Breen– Assistant Client Executive, Racepoint Global London

Maurizio Sarri was criticised by media, ex-pros and fans for the way he conducted his post-match interview following Chelsea’s 2-0 defeat to Arsenal on Saturday.

Sarri was accompanied by his translator to get his message across in as clear a way as possible. And everyone heard his comments loud and clear, as he accused his players of being ‘extremely difficult to motivate.’

Many in the media argued Sarri’s approach sent out a negative message to the players. That the dressing down should have happened in the changing room, behind closed doors. The general feeling was – when you consider Chelsea’s history with managers – Sarri’s candid approach could only end one way.

However, managers (and players) are often criticised for fobbing the media off with bland, clichéd answers. For not giving proper, full answers to questions – as Sarri did here

They can be criticised for expressing raw emotion after a game but they can also be condemned for holding a bland press conference, leaving media in need of a headline empty handed.

It’s an interesting tightrope for managers to walk.

I discussed the incident with my dad and fellow Chelsea fanatic this week, and we were on opposite sides of the argument.

He believed Sarri was wrong to comment the way he did and shouldn’t have brought a translator with him to the press conference. I wasn’t so sure.

Sarri needed the translator in order to express his disappointment and frustration at the players after a shoddy performance to a London rival. That would have been difficult to do with his current level of English. When you add to that the fact we have now lost to both Tottenham and Arsenal on the road this season, with unconvincing performances, I felt Sarri was right to address the issue publicly.

Ultimately, we will see in the coming weeks whether Sarri was right or wrong, but judging by last night’s result, the player’s passion was evident for all to see.